Improve My Search Ranking https://www.improvemysearchranking.com Fri, 24 Dec 2021 11:28:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.24 Google confirmed Local Search algorithm update https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/google-confirmed-local-search-algorithm-update/ https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/google-confirmed-local-search-algorithm-update/#respond Fri, 24 Dec 2021 10:30:26 +0000 https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/?p=17155 Google has recently confirmed that it ran a local search ranking update, which is now being referred to as the November 2021 Local Search update.  The update ran between November 30th and December 8th. So if you noticed any significant changes — positive or negative — in local search rankings between November 30th and December […]

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Google has recently confirmed that it ran a local search ranking update, which is now being referred to as the November 2021 Local Search update. 

The update ran between November 30th and December 8th.

So if you noticed any significant changes — positive or negative — in local search rankings between November 30th and December 8th, you now know the reason.

Here is the tweet by Google confirming the November 2021 Local Search update:

“Our November 2021 local search update has concluded. It began [on] Nov 30 and ran through Dec 8. It involved a rebalancing of various factors we consider in generating local search results. General guidance for businesses remains the same as covered here: https://t.co/uyXFfmUEIR

google-search-central

The November 2021 Local Search update overlapped with other ranking updates as well as a design interface update for Google Maps and local pack. Both these changes at the same time may have resulted in traffic and ranking changes for either your business or your clients’ businesses. 

Because the timing overlapped, it might be difficult to identify exactly what led to how much change.

Google’s Local Search ranking factors

In the announcement tweet, Google mentioned that the update involved “a rebalancing of various factors we consider in generating local search results.”

That’s why it would be a good idea to revisit what ranking factors Google focuses on for local search results. The three main categories are:

  • Relevance.  Relevance refers to how well a local business matches the searcher’s query.  For instance, despite the proximity, a search about a flower shop won’t rank a casino in the local search results.
  • Distance.  Because local search results are more focused on location, the distance of the business is another important factor that Google considers. Despite how relevant the query is, it is unlikely that Google will prioritize a business that is in another state.
  • Prominence.  Lastly, Google also evaluates how well known, credible, and popular a business is.

Google has never shared the exact details of how much weight it gives to these different search engine ranking factors. However, now that Google has “rebalanced” these factors, it is a good idea to just revisit how well your business ranks for each of these factors and work on the shortcomings. 

For instance, if your business already performs well in the relevance category (e.g., proper keyword optimisation and category selection), perhaps it’s the right time to focus on another category, such as prominence, by improving user reviews.

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How does downtime affect a website’s SEO? https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/downtime-affect-websites-seo/ https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/downtime-affect-websites-seo/#respond Fri, 24 Dec 2021 10:21:49 +0000 https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/?p=17159 Although no one likes to see website downtime, it is not something that can be eliminated completely. Either because of poor servers or maintenance shutdown, websites can go down. However, the important question is what kind of impact website downtime can have on a website’s search engine performance and rankings?  Google’s John Mueller recently talked […]

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Although no one likes to see website downtime, it is not something that can be eliminated completely. Either because of poor servers or maintenance shutdown, websites can go down.

However, the important question is what kind of impact website downtime can have on a website’s search engine performance and rankings? 

Google’s John Mueller recently talked about this during the December 10 Google Search Central SEO Office Hours hangout video.

An SEO professional asked John Mueller how he can minimize the impact on search rankings when the client website goes down for up to a week.

As John Mueller confirmed, unfortunately, there is no way to have a website down for a week and not face any negative SEO consequences. While there are ways to at least handle planned maintenance shutdown more effectively, there is never any guarantee of avoiding negative effects.

“Any time you have a longer outage, where I’m thinking more than a couple of days, I would assume that at least temporarily you will have really strong fluctuations, and it’s going to take a little bit of time to get back in.

It’s not impossible because these things happen sometimes. But if there’s anything you can do to avoid this kind of outage, I would try to do that.”

503 Result Codes

Whether the downtime is planned maintenance shutdown or unintentional, there is a possibility of negative consequences. However, if it is a planned maintenance shutdown for a day or two, then you should inform Google with a 503 result code.

“For an outage of maybe a day or so, using a 503 result code is a great way to tell us that we should check back.”

A 503 result code can help, but even that doesn’t work if the downtime is longer than usual. According to John:

“… but after a couple of days, we think this is a permanent result code, and we think your pages are just gone, and we will drop them from the index.

And when the pages come back, we will crawl them again, and we will try to index them again. But it’s essentially during that time we will probably drop a lot of the pages from the website from our index, and there’s a pretty good chance that it’ll come back in a similar way, but it’s not always guaranteed.”

Static versions

Another method is to redirect users to a static version of your website during the downtime. But for that method to work, it is important to ensure the outage lasts for less than a day.

“That could be something like setting up a static version of the website somewhere and just showing that to users for the time being. But especially if you’re doing this in a planned way, I would try to find ways to reduce the outage to less than a day if at all possible.”

Manually indexing pages

In cases like these, it is also possible to manually ask Google to index the pages on your website that it may have deindexed during the outage. This might expedite the indexation process, but as we just learned, you will still likely feel some negative effects.

You can manually submit pages for indexing the following way:

  • Log in to your Google Search Console account.
  • Browse to the URL inspection tool.
  • Paste the URL of the page that you’d like Google to index.
  • Click the ‘Request indexing’ button after Google checks the URL.

If Google still doesn’t index a page, it is also a recommended practice to double-check the robots.txt file, canonical tags, and redirects. Additionally, you can also create internal links to that page from other web pages on your site that are already indexed.

How to minimize website downtime

Your website is a way to stay connected with your potential and existing customers 24/7. You can’t achieve that goal if your website is down often. This damages the credibility of your business — in addition to all the negative SEO effects we talked about earlier.

Therefore, one of your big focuses should be to increase website uptime. Here are a few tips on how you can achieve that:

  • Choose a reliable web host. An unreliable web host is often the biggest culprit why websites go down.
  • Lighten website load. Compress images, minify CSS and JS files, and minimize HTTP requests. All that helps.
  • Upgrade hosting plans. As your website grows in size and traffic, you will likely need better hosting plans, e.g., managed hosting plans.
  • Deploy uptime monitoring plugins. Despite attempts, nearly all websites experience downtime. It is, therefore, important to use website uptime monitoring plugins to diagnose negative spikes and trends before they become bigger problems.
  • Increase website security. Hackers attempt to force a website down to steal data. By improving your website security, you also decrease the likelihood of your website going down.

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Team Interview Series: Josh https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/team-interview-series-josh/ https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/team-interview-series-josh/#respond Tue, 07 Dec 2021 11:05:39 +0000 https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/?p=17115 In this team interview series, we’re introducing each member of the IMSR team as they share key insights into the world of digital marketing, some of their hottest SEO ‘takes’, and more. This week, we’re interviewing SEO Specialist, Josh Hamit.   1.  If you wrote a book about working in the SEO world, what would the title be? […]

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In this team interview series, we’re introducing each member of the IMSR team as they share key insights into the world of digital marketing, some of their hottest SEO ‘takes’, and more.

This week, we’re interviewing SEO Specialist, Josh Hamit.

 

1.  If you wrote a book about working in the SEO world, what would the title be?

  • The Return of the Title Tag; Why On-Page SEO Is King / SEO: The Domain Authority Awakens

 

2. What’s a common misconception you often hear about SEO?

  • That SEO is a ‘dark art’ and you need to do suspect things to your website to make it appear highly in Google. The complete opposite is true. You need to make your website is as user friendly as possible to get the best SEO results.

 

3. What drew you to a career in SEO?

  • The biggest lure of SEO for me is the mixture of technical and creative elements required to produce an effective campaign. I love that there are best practices and rules you can follow that will undoubtably improve your website’s ability to rank in Google. And once these best practices have been followed and you’re ranking in the upper echelons of Google, creativity and testing and measuring plays a huge part in getting you into that number one spot. I guess I am a numbers man, and I love to tinker and optimise things until they move in the direction I want!

 

4. Can you share one example of an SEO method that is often underrated or overlooked?

  • Internal linking! Off-site SEO, and particularly the idea of acquiring backlinks gets huge amounts of attention (and rightly-so), but how you optimise your website’s link structure internally plays a massive role in how your website will perform in Google. Sitemaps, blog side-bars, your main navigation, footer areas and anchor text are important areas to consider when planning your internal links. Don’t forget to!

 

5.  What is one unexpected skill you have picked up during your time at Improve My Search Ranking?

  • I’ve learnt so much it’s hard to choose one thing. But what comes to mind right now is the skill of learning about how other businesses operate and what type of SEO strategy would work best for them. I learn a lot from our clients on how we can improve as a business too. It’s always a pleasure to speak and learn from our clients about their businesses.

 

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Is the length of a page title a search ranking factor? Google answers https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/length-page-title-search-ranking-factor-google-answers-2/ https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/length-page-title-search-ranking-factor-google-answers-2/#respond Mon, 06 Dec 2021 10:51:02 +0000 https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/?p=17087 More often than not, we see web page titles around 55 to 65 characters in length. That is also the advice and recommendation that most SEO professionals share, i.e., to keep the meta title length around that mark. But there doesn’t seem to be any concrete official guidance by Google on what the page length […]

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More often than not, we see web page titles around 55 to 65 characters in length. That is also the advice and recommendation that most SEO professionals share, i.e., to keep the meta title length around that mark. But there doesn’t seem to be any concrete official guidance by Google on what the page length should be.

This leads to a question: does this length of the page actually matter, and can it affect the search engine rankings of a page?

This exact question was recently asked by a person in a recent Google SEO Office Hours Hangout.

“Is that a really good factor of ranking, that the title (length) should be like something with the limitation?”

The person who asked this question worked in a news organization. Because of the nature of news articles, most of the pages had titles longer than the typical 55-65 character limit. His suggestions to shorten the page title’s length weren’t always liked by the newsroom management.

“They were very upset about that because …news should be like a long title and a good title.”

Google’s John Mueller answered the question by confirming that the length of the page title is not a ranking factor.

“No, no. The length doesn’t matter.

If we show something shorter or if we show something slightly different, that’s just kind of how we display it in the search results, it doesn’t mean the ranking changes,” said John Mueller.

John followed it up with further explanation:

“So, I think, kind of picking a number from your side and saying on mobile like this much room is available so as an editorial guideline — we’ll say 65 or whatever you want to choose.

That’s perfectly fine.

From Google, from the search quality [and] the ranking side, we don’t have any guideline that says it [page title] should be this long.”

Google’s recommendations

According to Google’s recommendations regarding title tag best practices:

“Title links are critical to giving users a quick insight into the content of a result and why it’s relevant to their query.”

How to write effective page titles

While the length of the page title is not a search engine ranking factor, it is a good idea to keep it within the character limit, so Google does not truncate it or rewrite it completely.

For more tips, read this post: How to Write Page Titles and Meta Descriptions.

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What does Google say about 301 redirects and how to use them? https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/google-say-301-redirects-use/ https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/google-say-301-redirects-use/#respond Mon, 06 Dec 2021 10:49:08 +0000 https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/?p=17088 301 redirects are a very important part of a well-maintained search engine optimised website. Although redirects are avoided as much as possible, it is virtually impossible to completely eliminate broken links and redirects. Otherwise, without 301 redirects, there will be just broken links that are not only bad for search engine rankings but also lead […]

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301 redirects are a very important part of a well-maintained search engine optimised website. Although redirects are avoided as much as possible, it is virtually impossible to completely eliminate broken links and redirects.

Otherwise, without 301 redirects, there will be just broken links that are not only bad for search engine rankings but also lead to a poor user experience for your website visitors.

In this post, we will share for how long Google suggests a 301 redirect should be kept in place and answer a few more frequently asked questions about 301 redirects. 

But first, let’s see what a 301 redirect is, so we’re on the same page.

What is a 301 redirect?

A 301 redirect is used when a page has been moved permanently to a new location. On the other hand, a 302 redirect is used for temporary redirection.

For instance, if you rebrand your business and move to a different domain, this is a permanent change and, therefore, a 301 redirect, in this case, would be appropriate.

How long should a 301 redirect be kept in place?

Google’s John Mueller recently answered this question. More specifically, he mentioned how redirects are identified and tracked at Google, and why a longer time period is necessary for Google to check the redirect a few times. 

According to him:

“At Google, we try to reprocess all pages at least every few months. Most pages are checked more often. However, the amount of crawling is limited, and there are many pages that we’d like to crawl, so we have to prioritize.

When a URL changes, our systems need to see the change in the form of a redirect at least a few times in order to record that change.

To be certain that a redirect has been seen a few times, we recommend keeping the redirect in place for at least one year.”

Do 301 redirects pass PageRank completely?

Another common question about 301 redirects is whether they pass the PageRank completely or not?

Matt Cutts once shared some insights into how effective 301 redirects can be when it comes to passing PageRank. According to Matt:

“The amount of PageRank that dissipates through a 301 is almost exactly, is currently identical to the amount of PageRank that dissipates through a link.”

How effective is Google at crawling 301 redirects?

As you know, there are multiple types of redirects. However, 301 redirect is usually more common and considered a safer option in most cases.

And there is evidence to support it.

In 2021, Google updated its guidance in Advanced SEO documentation and confirmed that of all the different redirect types, Google is more likely to correctly crawl 301 redirects.

“A server side redirect has the highest chance of being interpreted correctly by Google,” Google updated in its guidance.

What about redirect chains?

Last but not least, it is easy to use 301 redirects liberally. In that case, you will likely end up with 301 redirect chains. That is something that you should avoid.

According to John Mueller:

“The only thing I’d watch out for is that you have less than five hops for URLs that are frequently crawled. With multiple hops, the main effect is that it’s a bit slower for users. Search engines just follow the redirect chain (for Google: up to five hops in the chain per crawl attempt).”

Conclusion

As mentioned earlier, 301 redirects are an important part of any established website. For one reason or another, it is common to redirect pages and change their URLs.

However, properly using 301 redirects is crucial. Otherwise, it may backfire and affect your search engine rankings.

We hope that this article — with advice directly from Google — will help you create a robust strategy on how to use 301 redirects effectively and safely.

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Google algorithm update to affect product review pages https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/google-algorithm-update-affect-product-review-pages/ https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/google-algorithm-update-affect-product-review-pages/#respond Mon, 06 Dec 2021 10:30:32 +0000 https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/?p=17078 Google recently announced that a new algorithm update is being rolled out in December 2021. This algorithm update will primarily target product review pages. Just in time for the Holidays. The timing, however, makes some sense from the buyers’ perspective. Online purchase activities increase significantly during the holiday period. Genuine, high-quality product reviews become more […]

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Google recently announced that a new algorithm update is being rolled out in December 2021. This algorithm update will primarily target product review pages.

Just in time for the Holidays.

The timing, however, makes some sense from the buyers’ perspective. Online purchase activities increase significantly during the holiday period. Genuine, high-quality product reviews become more important than ever.

You may remember that a similar algorithm update was first launched in April 2021. Following that update, websites that made improvements are expected to see changes reflected in the December 2021 algorithm update.

According to the announcement by Google, the update will take approximately three weeks to fully roll out.

“Our December 2021 product reviews update is now rolling out for English-language pages. It will take about three weeks to complete,” a tweet from Google Search Central stated.

The tweet also mentioned that the guidance for product review creators had been updated. The updated guidance can be found here.

Following that, Alan Kent, Google Developer Advocate, shared more details about the update in a tweet:

“It is one of many ranking signals, but certainly the goal is to reward authentic high quality reviews. The docs page lists our recommendations for good reviews.”

Alan Kent also specified the type of websites that can expect to be affected — positively or negatively — by this update:

“Mainly relevant to sites that post articles reviewing products. Think of sites like “best TVs under $200″.com. [The] goal is to improve the quality and usefulness of reviews we show users.”

Product Review Best Practices

Google has also confirmed that two new product review requirements are being introduced — targeted specifically at fake product reviews.

  • The first practice is that there should be evidence on the product review page that can confirm that the reviewer has actually used the product.
  • The second practice is that the reviewer should offer multiple buying options.

According to Google:

“Users have told us that they trust reviews with evidence of products actually being tested, and prefer to have more options to purchase the product.

Provide evidence such as visuals, audio, or other links of your own experience with the product, to support your expertise and reinforce the authenticity of your review.

Include links to multiple sellers to give the reader the option to purchase from their merchant of choice.”

It is important to note that Google does not call these best practices ‘ranking factors’ but does indicate that these best practices will become a part of future product review algorithm updates (as search engine ranking factors).

Conclusion

The timing of this algorithm update can be questioned. There is a possibility that genuine product review websites might be affected during such a busy holiday season.

However, from the perspective of online buyers, fake reviews can be very damaging. With these two new best practices and the overall algorithm update, we expect online searchers and buyers to have a much better experience this Holiday.

For webmasters and online product reviewers, just keep following the guidelines recommended by Google, and you’ll likely pass through this December 2021 Google algorithm update unscathed.

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Is the length of a page title a search ranking factor? Google answers https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/length-page-title-search-ranking-factor-google-answers/ https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/length-page-title-search-ranking-factor-google-answers/#respond Tue, 30 Nov 2021 10:30:05 +0000 https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/?p=17033 More often than not, we see web page titles around 55 to 65 characters in length. That is also the advice and recommendation that most SEO professionals share, i.e., to keep the meta title length around that mark. But there doesn’t seem to be any concrete official guidance by Google on what the page length […]

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More often than not, we see web page titles around 55 to 65 characters in length. That is also the advice and recommendation that most SEO professionals share, i.e., to keep the meta title length around that mark. But there doesn’t seem to be any concrete official guidance by Google on what the page length should be.

This leads to a question: does this length of the page actually matter, and can it affect the search engine rankings of a page?

This exact question was recently asked by a person in a recent Google SEO Office Hours Hangout.

“Is that a really good factor of ranking, that the title (length) should be like something with the limitation?”

The person who asked this question worked in a news organization. Because of the nature of news articles, most of the pages had titles longer than the typical 55-65 character limit. His suggestions to shorten the page title’s length weren’t always liked by the newsroom management.

“They were very upset about that because …news should be like a long title and a good title.”

Google’s John Mueller answered the question by confirming that the length of the page title is not a ranking factor.

“No, no. The length doesn’t matter.

If we show something shorter or if we show something slightly different, that’s just kind of how we display it in the search results, it doesn’t mean the ranking changes,” said John Mueller.

John followed it up with further explanation:

“So, I think, kind of picking a number from your side and saying on mobile like this much room is available so as an editorial guideline — we’ll say 65 or whatever you want to choose.

That’s perfectly fine.

From Google, from the search quality [and] the ranking side, we don’t have any guideline that says it [page title] should be this long.”

 

Google’s recommendations

 

According to Google’s recommendations regarding title tag best practices:

“Title links are critical to giving users a quick insight into the content of a result and why it’s relevant to their query.”

 

How to write effective page titles

 

While the length of the page title is not a search engine ranking factor, it is a good idea to keep it within the character limit, so Google does not truncate it or rewrite it completely.

For more tips, read this post: How to Write Page Titles and Meta Descriptions.

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Team Interview Series: Howard https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/team-interview-series-howard/ https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/team-interview-series-howard/#respond Tue, 23 Nov 2021 10:15:55 +0000 https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/?p=16903 In this team interview series, we’re introducing each member of the IMSR team as they share key insights into the world of digital marketing, some of their hottest SEO ‘takes’, and more. This week, we’re interviewing SEO Executive, Howard Head.   1. If you wrote a novel about working in the SEO world, what would the title be? SEO […]

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In this team interview series, we’re introducing each member of the IMSR team as they share key insights into the world of digital marketing, some of their hottest SEO ‘takes’, and more.

This week, we’re interviewing SEO Executive, Howard Head.

 

1. If you wrote a novel about working in the SEO world, what would the title be?

  • SEO Wars: Google Strikes Back!

 

2. What drew you to a career in SEO?

  • Every business needs marketing to ensure that consumers are aware of their products/services, it is a crucial part of any business. Increased awareness, leads to more sales. SEO is the most effect digital marketing method, ensuring that relevant consumers are attracted to a businesses site, further increasing the likelihood of a conversion. Fully comprehending the benefits that SEO can bring to businesses, and understanding how much value my job role adds to businesses is a key motivator of me! What’s not to like about SEO?

 

3. Are you a coffee person or a tea person?

  • I’m a massive fan of both! Can’t beat a nice warm caffeinated beverage.

 

4. Name one piece of media that you’d recommend to those who want to learn more about SEO. This can be a book, podcast, blog, etc.

  • Brian Dean’s blog/newsletter at https://backlinko.com/ is fantastic, and I highly recommend it to anyone wanting to further improve their SEO skills.

 

5. What is your No.1 tip for working from home?

  • A good pair of noise cancelling ear phones (a quiet environment is a must!), a clean desk/workspace, and a coffee/tea station ready on standby!

 

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5 big SEO predictions from Google’s Search Relations team https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/5-big-seo-predictions-googles-search-relations-team/ https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/5-big-seo-predictions-googles-search-relations-team/#respond Thu, 18 Nov 2021 11:00:54 +0000 https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/?p=16945 SEO is extremely dynamic. It is always evolving and changing.  SEO professionals need to stay up-to-date with all the news and recent algorithm updates to make sure they are making the right moves.  In addition, they also need to be able to see what’s coming in the future. This allows them to prepare for what’s […]

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SEO is extremely dynamic. It is always evolving and changing. 

SEO professionals need to stay up-to-date with all the news and recent algorithm updates to make sure they are making the right moves. 

In addition, they also need to be able to see what’s coming in the future. This allows them to prepare for what’s coming ahead — both in terms of implementing the best SEO practices on websites and in terms of personal SEO career trajectory and development.

The veterans in Google’s Search Relations team — John Mueller, Gary Illyes, and Martin Splitt — recently came together in the latest episode of the Search Off the Record podcast and predicted the future of SEO and the industry for SEO professionals.

Following are five of the big SEO predictions they made on the podcast.

 

1. HTML will continue to play a big role in SEO

 

At the start of the discussion, John Mueller suggested that SEOs won’t need to learn HTML in the future. His reasoning was that modern content management systems (CMS’s) are becoming more advanced and now accommodate a lot of the technical HTML stuff.

“Well, I mean, it’s like if you just have a rich editor and you just type things in, and then you format your text properly, and you add some links. What do you need to do with HTML?”

However, Gary Illyes disagreed. According to Gary, SEO isn’t just content, and HTML is needed for a lot of the other stuff — links, meta tags, structured data elements, etc.

“SEO is also about link tags and meta tags and title elements and all those weird things in the head section of the HTML that you can put there.

So you kind of want to know about them to control how your snippets look like or how your titles show up in search results and the rel canonical tag to control what will be the– or what should be the canonical version of a URL. You kind of want to know that,” said Gary Illyes.

In the end, all three agreed that SEOs would continue to need to understand HTML and how to use it.

 

2. IP addresses won’t’ replace URLs

 

There is a debate that IP addresses may replace URLs in the future. But Gary Illyes doesn’t see it happening.

“Fortunately, URLs cannot go away… At least not in the foreseeable future, because the URLs they are the

standard way to communicate addresses on the Internet. And without that the Internet is just not the Internet.

The same way domain names cannot go away because of how the Internet is built or IP addresses cannot go away because of how the Internet is built. The same way URLs cannot go away.”

 

3. The need for structured data is diminishing fast

 

Martin Splitt mentioned that Google still uses structured data to understand a page, and it is recommended, but Google is becoming so advanced that it might bypass the need for structured data in the future.

The following response by Martin Splitt was in response to the question: in the future, will Google not need structured data to understand a page?

“I’m pretty sure we can understand: Oh, this is a product, and the product’s name is this and the product’s price is that and this is a product image.”

However, Martin says, despite this, it’s good to have explicit machine-readable information.

 

4. Voice search may not be the future of SEO

 

The rise of voice-enabled mobile assistants and smart homes has led to the idea that voice search may become the future of SEO and the primary way searches happen.

When asked about the future of voice search, Martin Splitt says:

“Oh God, the future that never will be. I think no.”

He also added:

“I think in the future, it won’t change and will naturally or magically become the number one thing that we need to worry about, simply because it changes the input modality, and it changes probably how queries are phrased, but it doesn’t change the fundamental use of natural language to retrieve information from the Internet.”

Martin said that you don’t have to worry too much about it.

 

5. Machine-generated content isn’t the replacement yet

 

Can machine-generated content replace content created by humans? Will websites and SEO professionals need human content writers in the future?

Gary Illyes says that he sees the potential in machine-generated content, but it’s not going to have any big impact on its own in the near future, at least.

“Right now, our stance on machine-generated content is that if it’s without human supervision, then we don’t want it in search. If someone reviews it before putting it up for the public, then it’s fine.”

 

Conclusion

 

So there you have it.

The five big SEO-related predictions by Google’s Search Relations team.

Where do you think SEO is heading in the future? Let us know what you think.

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30 pages do not make a website authoritative, Google hints https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/30-pages-not-make-website-authoritative-google-hints/ https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/30-pages-not-make-website-authoritative-google-hints/#respond Tue, 16 Nov 2021 11:00:24 +0000 https://www.improvemysearchranking.com/?p=16940 How many pages should your website have? Is it better to have lots of (relatively) lower-quality pages, or is it better to have fewer but higher-quality pages? These are some of the questions that have been a matter of debate for a long time. Google’s John Mueller recently shared insights into what makes a website […]

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How many pages should your website have?

Is it better to have lots of (relatively) lower-quality pages, or is it better to have fewer but higher-quality pages?

These are some of the questions that have been a matter of debate for a long time. Google’s John Mueller recently shared insights into what makes a website authoritative and how the number of web pages affects it.

The conversation began on Reddit, where the OP asked why Google isn’t indexing new content as quickly as it did previously. According to OP, they have 30 articles published on their website and resumed publishing new content after a three-month hiatus.

OP also thinks their website is authoritative because of the links it has received.

Google’s John Mueller responded that “it’s really hard to call a site authoritative after 30 articles.”

He further added why Google would take more time to index content because of the three-month hiatus period. 

“Especially if you have stopped publishing for a while, I can see how Google might be [a] bit more conservative with regards to indexing more,” John said.

In his response, John Mueller also confirmed that there is nothing wrong or broken with Google’s indexation system.

“I don’t see anything broken in the way Google indexes stuff at the moment. I do see us being critical about what we pick up for indexing though, as any search engine should.”

To overcome this problem and a period of lull, John suggested OP continue to publish more high-quality content pages on their website. There is no shortcut here.

“Over time, as we see that your site is more than just “30 ok posts”, and instead something we’re keen on sending as many users to as possible, then indexing will pick up.

This isn’t something you can push through technical means though, it’s not the button-push before indexing that makes your site by far the best of its kind.”

 

The takeaways

 

There is plenty of good information here. More importantly, this response by John gives a glimpse of the mindset that Google uses to rank and prioritize websites on the SERPs.

First, Google doesn’t just send search engine users to a page; they send them to a website. And a website is more than the sum of its pages. If you want your website to be considered authoritative, it needs to cover various subtopics in a niche comprehensively.

Second, you cannot go on a big hiatus in which you do not publish anything new. This directly affects the credibility and authority of your website. As a result, it takes longer for search engines to start indexing and ranking your content again.

Use these two lessons to improve your website’s ranking and authority on the SERPs.

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